Courses

An introduction to the field of gerontology. The course takes a multidisciplinary approach to the study of aging and older adults,considering biological, psychological and sociological perspectives. GRN 100 is open to all students; there are no prerequisites. the course can count as a social science, or as a cultural diversity course.

Credit Hours: 3

Physical changes and common pathologies associated with the aging process, with special emphasis on the psychological and social implications of these changes in the lives of older adults. Key topics include theories of aging; changes and disorders in the skeletal, nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems; dementia, delirium and mild cognitive impairment.

Credit Hours: 3

An opportunity for students to conduct collaborative research under the supervision of a faculty mentor or engage in an independent study program. Both options require a written report.

Credit Hours: 3

Individual research of a substantive nature pursued in the student’s major field of study. The research will conclude in a written thesis or an original project and an oral defense.

Credit Hours: 3

Individual research of a substantive nature pursued in the student’s major field of study. The research will conclude in a written thesis or an original project and an oral defense.

Credit Hours: 3

An integration of the disciplines of ethics and aging.  Critical issues include dementia, long-term care, ageism, public policy, medical treatments, elder abuse, disaster response, determinants of consent (for research participants and for patients), euthanasia, patient autonomy, and the challenges of resource allocation.

Credit Hours: 3

A work-study program providing relevant employment experience. The objective of the program is to integrate classroom theory and practical work experience, thus lending relevancy to learning and providing the student with a realistic exposure to career opportunities.

3-6 credit hours