Courses

Arabic

This course continues to develop the four basic language skills (writing, reading, speaking, listening) begun in Arabic 101. There will be an emphasis on active vocabulary learning, and on developing the ability to use the language to accomplish basic interpersonal communicative tasks

Credit Hours: 3

Students will explore various aspects of Arabic culture, with an emphasis on current trends in art, politics, religion, and entertainment in the Middle East and North Africa. Students will examine implications of cultural stereotypes by comparing their own heritage with social, geographic, and political identities of the modern Arab world. This course is conducted in English, and is open to all students, regardless of their background in Arabic language.
This course cannot be used to satisfy a foreign-language requirement.

Credit Hours: 3

Review and expansion of communication skills through materials reflecting the history, literature, and culture of the Arabic world.

Credit Hours: 6   /  available as individual studies with the approval of the instructor   /   Prerequisites: ARA 101; ARA 102

A basic course in reading, writing, speaking and listening to Modern Standard Arabic, with some exposure to the Egyptian dialect. There will be an emphasis on active vocabulary learning, and on developing the ability to use the language to accomplish basic interpersonal communicative tasks.

Credit Hours: 3

American Sign Language

This course is the prerequisite for all other ASL courses. It will build a foundation of basic vocabulary, usage, linguistic, and cultural concepts. Emphasis is placed on the language impact of Deafness. The study of ASL and Deaf culture provides skills applicable to employment in both the public and private sector.

Credit Hours: 3

American Sign Language is the natural language of the deaf. It uses its own syntax, vocabulary, and metalinguistic rules. this course uses the Signing Naturally curriculum, workbook activities, video exercises, and classroom expressive and receptive language drills to present ASL theories. Other topics to be addressed include finger spelling, Deaf culture, and assistive technology.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: ASL 100

Building upon the basic structures presented in ASL 100, this course focuses on culturally significant topics related to the Deaf community, more complex ASL grammatical features, vocabulary building, classifiers, comprehension and development of medium length stories, narratives and dialogues.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: ASL 200

This course continues to develop the communication skills covered in ASL 201, focusing specifically on culturally significant topics related to the Deaf community, more complex ASL grammatical features, vocabulary building, storytelling, narratives and dialogues.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: ASL

This course examines Deafness from a cultural/linguistic perspective. Students will learn to recognize and appreciate the Deaf sub-culture through study of language influence, customs, and history. Skills for cross-cultural interaction will be practiced. Emphasis will be placed on the Deaf perspective, current trends and Deafness in the workplace.

Credit Hours: 3

Chinese

Basic course in Chinese emphasizing skills in oral and written communication with an introduction to the culture and civilization of China. Open to students with no previous study of Chinese.

Credit Hours: 3

This course continues to develop oral and written skills that were introduced in Chinese 101, with a special emphasis on the ability to read and write Chinese characters. Presentations of Chinese culture and customs are also a content focus of this course.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: CHI 101 or the equivalent

A general introduction to China's distinct cultural identity, as represented in its poetry, prose fiction, cinema, arts, and folklore. This course will also compare important cultural differences between the United States and China in the domains of business etiquette and social conventions. This course is conducted in English, and is open to all students, regardless of their background in Chinese language.
This course cannot be used to satisfy a foreign language requirement for non-majors.

French

This course is intended for student who anticipate a career in elementary education. Students will learn basic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the French language, and, at the same time, pedagogical methods and active learning modules appropriate to K-5 learners.

Credit Hours: 3

Basic course in French emphasizing skills in oral and written communication with an introduction to the culture and civilization of the Francophone world. Open to students with no previous study of French or with the permission of the chairperson of the department of foreign languages.

Credit Hours: 3

Course continues to develop the four basic functions of language begun in French 101: speaking, understanding, reading and writing while stressing vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation. The culture of the Francophone world will form the content area of the course.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: FRE 101 or the equivalent

Review and expansion of communication skills (speaking, reading and writing) through materials reflecting the history, literature, and culture of the Francophone world.

Credit Hours: 6   /   Prerequisites: FRE 101-102, or permission of the instructor

An introduction to vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, and grammatical constructions appropriate to a francophone business setting. In addition to building basic communication skills, the course covers various aspects of French business etiquette, commercial jargon, and correspondence. Taught partly in English, this course is open to students with basic skills in French language.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: FRE 102, or permission of the instructor

A survey of various themes and social questions regarding the position that women have held in French society from the 12th century to the present, as these are treated in poetry, prose fiction, cinema and drama by and about female authors. Conducted in English, with all texts read in translation, this course is open to all students, regardless of their background in French.
This course cannot be used to satisfy a foreign-language requirement for nonmajors. It may count as a culture course required for the minor.

Credit Hours: 3

Development of fluency in the language as well as of ability to write original compositions. Includes the study of various aspects of Francophone people and their culture.

Credit Hours: 6   /   Prerequisites: FRE 103-104 or permission of the instructor

A survey of political, social, intellectual and artistic history of Quebec as reflected in its literature.

Credit Hours: 3

Students examine selected literary texts published in French by contemporary francophone writers. Texts are studied in terms of their contemporary social and cultural context within the greater francophone world.

Credit Hours: 3

An introduction to the cultural institutions of post-war France, this course examines the political structure, technological developments, and social issues of the Fifth Republic, with special emphasis on current events and contemporary media.

Credit Hours: 3

A survey of the history of France from the Middle Ages to World War II, through thematic studies of the artistic and literary developments, social and political movements, philosophical trends, and historic personalities that helped to shape France of the twenty-first century.

Credit Hours: 3

Introduction to the techniques and problems of translation. Includes written, consecutive and simultaneous translation as well as subtitling. Usually taken abroad.

Credit Hours: 3

A variable topics course which means to introduce students to particular cultural aspects of the francophone world through a close study and examination of its films.

Credit Hours: 3

Each student pursues a topic independently under the direction of a staff member. The student must have a written report of his/her findings approved. The approved written report is to be filed with the chairperson of the department.

Credit Hours: 3

Individual research of a substantive nature pursued in the student's major field of study. The research will conclude in a written thesis or an original project, and an oral defense.

Credit Hours: 6

Intensive study of sound system, intonation and accent. Usually taken abroad.

Credit Hours: 3

A survey of the major trends in the development of theatre literature, theory, and performance in France from the Middle Ages to the present.

Credit Hours: 3

An examination of selected major works of prose, theatre and poetry of the 20th centruy, within the context of social and political change.

Credit Hours: 3

Analysis of the ideas, techniques and major contributions of the
literary leaders of the Romantic movement.

Credit Hours: 3

Studies in post-Romantic prose and poetry with special emphasis on Baudelaire, Flaubert, Verlaine, Mallarme and Zola.

Credit Hours: 3

Course designed to develop the personal writing style of the
student by means of grammatical and stylistic exercises as well as
creative and technical writing. Usually taken abroad.

Credit Hours: 6

Research work manifested in oral and written projects in keeping with the area of specialization of individual students.

Credit Hours: 3

A student having attained advanced proficiency in French will lead weekly lab sessions as a supplement to French 205-206. These sessions consist of grammar exercises, vocabulary drills, conversational activities, and cultural modules. With a pedagogical supervisor, the student will examine various language acquisition strategies while preparing a cumulative teaching portfolio.

Credit Hours: 3

Course designed to provide students who have already attained a level of fluency with opportunity to perfect their skills by means of group work and individualized activities.

Credit Hours: 3

A junior or senior work-study program providing relevant employment experience. Registration will occur at the beginning of the experience. The objective of the program is to integrate classroom theory and practical work experience, thus lending relevancy to learning and providing the student with a realistic exposure to career opportunities. Students interested in taking an internship or co-op should talk to their adviser.

Greek

An introduction to Ancient Greek, using reading as a pathway to understanding the forms, grammar, and structure of the language. Along with acquiring basic reading skills in Greek , students will study the culture and civilization of the 5th century Greek world, and its influence on the English language.

Credit Hours: 3

Italian

Basic course in Italian emphasizing skills in oral and written
communication with an introduction to the culture and civilization
of Italy. Open to students with no previous study of Italian.

Credit Hours: 3

Course continues to develop the four basic functions of language: speaking, understanding, reading and writing, while stressing vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation. The culture of Italy will also form the content of the course.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: ITA 101 or the equivalent

Review and expansion of communication skills (speaking, reading, and writing) through materials reflecting the history, literature, and culture of Italy.

Credit Hours: 6   /   Prerequisites: ITA 101-102 or permission of the instructor

This course introduces students to various aspects of Italian culture, with an emphasis on contemporary trends in art, politics, religion, and entertainment. Students will explore several issues in Italian cultural studies, including national stereotypes, popular culture, the media, social and political identities, minority populations, and current news-stories. Conducted in English, this course is open to all students, regardless of their background in Italian language. This course cannot be used to satisfy a language requirement.

Credit Hours: 3

Japanese

Basic course in Japanese emphasizing skills in oral and written communication with an introduction to the culture and civilization of Japan. Open to students with no previous study of Japanese or with the permission of the chair of the department of foreign languages.

Credit Hours: 3

Course continues to develop the four basic functions of language: speaking, understanding, reading, and writing, while stressing vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation. The culture of Japan will also form the content of the course.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: JPN 101 or equivalent

A general introduction to Japan's distinct cultural identity, as represented in its poetry, prose fiction, cinema, arts, and folklore. This course will also compare important cultural differences between the United States and Japan in the domains of business etiquette and social conventions. This course is taught in English.
This course cannot be used to satisfy a foreign language requirement.

Credit Hours: 3

Latin

A basic course in Latin emphasizing the essentials of grammatical structure, vocabulary, and the reading of selected texts based on a variety of Latin authors with an introduction to the culture and civilization of ancient Rome. Special emphasis on Latin roots of English words. Highly recommended for all arts and science majors particularly students in pre-law, premed, religious studies, English, and modern language programs.

Credit Hours: 3

Latin 102 is a continuation of Latin 101, which uses readings as a pathway to understanding the forms, grammar, and structure of the language of the Romans. Along with acquiring the ability to read Latin at an intermediate level, students will learn about the culture and civilization of the Greco-Roman world, the Latin influence on English and the Romance languages, with special emphasis on the Latin presence in English today.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: LAT 101 or permission of the instructor.

Spanish

Basic course in Spanish emphasizing skills in oral and written communication with an introduction to the culture and civilization of the Hispanic world. Open to students with no previous study of Spanish or with the permission of the chairperson of the department of foreign languages.

Credit Hours: 3

Course continues to develop the four basic functions of language begun in SPA 101: speaking, understanding, reading and writing while stressing vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation. The cultures of the Hispanic world also form the content of the course.

Credit Hours: 3

Review and expansion of communication skills (speaking, reading and writing) through materials reflecting the history, literature, and culture of the Hispanic world.

Credit Hours: 6   /   Prerequisites: SPA 101-102 or two years of high school Spanish

An introduction to vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, and grammatical constructions appropriate to a Spanish-speaking environment. In addition to building basic communication skills, the course covers various aspects of Spanish business protocol, commercial terminology and correspondence. This course would be of interest for students who would like to have a working knowledge for business relations with the Hispanic world.

Credit Hours: 3

A survey of various themes and social questions regarding the position that women have held in Spanish and Latin American societies from the 16th century to the present, as these are treated in poetry, prose fiction, testimony, cinema and drama by and about women. Conducted in English, with all texts read in translation, this course is open to all students, regardless of their background in Spanish.
This course cannot be used to satisfy a language or analytical skills requirement for non-majors. It may count as a culture course for the Spanish minor or major or Latin American Studies minor.

Credit Hours: 3

The development of fluency in the language as well as ability to write original compositions. Includes the study of various aspects of the Hispanic people and their cultures.

Credit Hours: 6   /   Prerequisites: SPA 103-104 or permission of the instructor.

A course for heritage speakers of Spanish who have little or no formal training in the language. Students with near native speaking ability seeking to perfect their Spanish skills may also enroll. Students will improve their Spanish grammar, reading and writing skills, as well as expand their knowledge of Hispanic cultures.

Credit Hours: 3

A survey of the political, social and artistic history of Spain from the Middle Ages to the present. Readings from representative texts illustrating the interrelatedness of the diverse facets of Spanish civilization.

Credit Hours: 3

Through a close examination of current Hispanic language media, students explore topics related to international politics, social structures, and culture within the contemporary Hispanic world.

Credit Hours: 3

A survey of the political, social and artistic history of Latin America from the pre-Hispanic days up to the Colonial period. Readings will emphasize the culture of the Mayas, Aztecs, Incas and other pre-Columbian peoples and the problems associated with the clash of exogenous cultures.

Credit Hours: 3

Introduction to the techniques and problems of translation. The course will give students practice in translating material in their chosen area of specialization.

Credit Hours: 3

A variable topics course which means to introduce students to particular cultural aspects of the Hispanic world through a close study and examination of its films.

Credit Hours: 3

Each student pursues a topic independently under the direction of a staff member. The student must have a written report of his/her findings approved. The approved written report is to be filed with the chairperson of the department.

Credit Hours: 3

The history of Spanish literature in the Middle Ages and the outstanding figures in the fields of drama, novel and poetry of the Golden Age.

Credit Hours: 6   /   Prerequisites: SPA 205-206

Intensive study of sound system, intonation and accent. Usually taken abroad.

Credit Hours: 3

Individual research of a substantive nature pursued in the student's
major field of study. The research will conclude in a written thesis or
an original project, and an oral defense.

Credit Hours: 6

Study and analysis of the thought and literature from the end of the Golden Age to the birth of the generation of 1898.

Credit Hours: 6

A study of the main trends and most representative authors during the 20th century in Spain in the fields of the novel, short story, essay, poetry and drama.

Credit Hours: 6

A study of the main literary works reflecting the spiritual and intellectual development of Latin America from pre-Columbian to contemporary times. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 6

Course designed to develop personal writing style of the student by means of grammatical and stylistic exercises, as well as creative and technical writing. Usually taken abroad.

Credit Hours: 6

A comprehensive study of Chicano literature and the contributions of “Chicanos” to the history and culture of Mexico and the United States through a study of literary, historical, and cultural texts. Special emphasis on the development of the Chicano cultural identity from its Mexican colonial roots through contemporary Chicano movements.

Credit Hours: 3

Research work manifested in oral and written projects in keeping with the area of specialization of individual students.

Credit Hours: 3

A student having attained advanced proficiency in Spanish will lead weekly lab sessions as a supplement to Spanish 205-206. These sessions consist of grammar exercises, vocabulary drills,  conversational activities, and cultural modules. With a pedagogical supervisor, the student will examine various language acquisition strategies while preparing a cumulative teaching portfolio.

Credit Hours: 3

Course designed to provide students who have already attained a level of fluency with the opportunity to perfect their skills by means of group work and individualized activities.

Credit Hours: 3

A junior or senior work-study program providing relevant employment experience. Registration will occur at the beginning of the experience. The objective of the program is to integrate classroom theory and practical work experience, thus lending relevancy to learning and providing the student with a realistic exposure to career opportunities. Students interested in taking a co-op or internship should talk to their adviser.