Curriculum

Required Courses

This course examines the key role that multicultural education plays in reaching the hearts and minds of our youth. The theories and practices of multicultural education are presented as central to learning not as marginal or added on to the “regular” curriculum. Study of multicultural concepts (e.g., inclusion, accurate representation, multiple perspectives, indigenous scholarship ) and ideas ( differences, accepting all cultures, different social, faith economic, and ethnic groups living together in harmony, tolerance evolving into a celebration of diversity, sports culture, drug culture, etc.,) will reveal how diverse knowledge bases have been historically muted in education and other discourses. In order to avoid replicating this exclusionary practice, prospective and practicing teachers will explore ways in which students’ (and their own) multiple identities are embedded in teaching and learning that accurately represents diverse knowledge bases. Such an approach is multicultural, celebrates diversity and can therefore emancipate because it encourages students to become thinkers and producers of knowledge –practices that increase students’ opportunities and life chances.

In this course multicultural history and personal family struggles will be used to inspire added self esteem, celebrate diversity, to encourage more responsible choices, improved behaviour of students and students at risk, the value of education and to promote mutual respect and reconciliation. 

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the principles of research in education.  Students will become effective consumers of educational research by analyzing the literature in a particular area of interest, synthesizing the results and determine if the area of interest enhances best practices.  Students will also develop practical research skills that they will use to assist them in their own continuous development within the profession. Teachers and administrators enrolled in this course will complete a review of the literature (in the area of interest), a presentation using empirical evidence and a reflection paper. The emphasis is to connect theory and practice how the area of interest has enhanced practice.

This is a required introductory course for all candidates in the Educational Leadership program.  This course is one of the first courses taken in the program.  Students outside of the Educational Leadership concentration may register with the permission of the instructor.

In this course, leadership theory will be applied through the use of individual assessment instruments i.e., analysis of video tapes, case studies, article critiques, role playing and self-assessment critiques.  The importance of style of leadership and influences that effect style will be emphasized. Other major concepts will be analyzed utilizing the Niagara University Leadership Matrix model.  These concepts include the attributes and skills to facilitate the leadership process for managing a school building organization.  The focus of this analysis is to help to assess the candidate’s acquisition of administrative attributes and skills in the context of school leadership.  

This is a required introductory course for all candidates in the Educational Leadership program.  Students outside of the Educational Leadership concentration may register with the permission of the instructor. In this course, leadership theory will be applied to the role of the principal by applying them to case studies and/or praxis scenarios. The importance of leadership approaches to achieve inclusivity and to contribute to school improvement will be emphasized. Other major concepts will be analyzed to explore attributes and skills necessary to facilitate the leadership process for managing a school building organization.  The focus of this analysis is to help to assess the candidate’s acquisition of attributes for successful school leadership.

This course includes a study of the current Ontario Statutes and Regulations which govern the schools of Ontario.  Students research the legislation both on-line and in class (hard copy) using a series of questions as a guide and through class discussion examine closely, the language, and its implications in a school (district) setting.  The history of school law is studied to show how the law changes in response to priorities issues and trends. Case studies are used to allow candidates to apply board policy and Ontario law to a given situation of interest. The candidates examine the consistency and/or discrepancies of the policy with law, formulate their response to the situation and present it to the class.  Various trends, reports, and court cases which have resulted in changes in the law are also examined.  The court cases are presented by teams of candidates in class and used to promote discussion of the interpretation of aspects of the statutes and regulations. 

This offering orients the individual to the functions and major principles of instructional supervision.  Attention is devoted to the critical examination of current research and publications about effective supervisory behavior.   Models for supervision are introduced and emphasized within the framework for improving teaching performance and its impact on student achievement.  Appropriate strategies for developing and implementing supervisory programs are stressed.

This course is designed to give the participants a background in the planning, designing,  and implementation of various curriculum and educational programs.

As leaders deal with the issue of effecting dynamic change, they will need to consider various processes and strategies:  1) professional learning and support for staff; 2) distributed leadership and democratic community; 3) fostering collaborative cultures; 4) supporting change processes and transitions.  Embedded in these approaches and strategies is the understanding of levels of change cycle development; key ideas from change theory; stages of concern and the complexity of change.  Addressing these processes and strategies is the focus of the course. 

This course provides the internship experience requirement for the master’s program in Ontario. Candidates will complete 300 internship hours. The course includes seminar sessions throughout the internship. The internship experiences are aligned with the program standards set out by the Educational Leadership Constituent Council. 

Each candidate’s prior acquired knowledge from program courses and applied field experiences in the Educational Research program will provide the base for research study, application and writing for this course. Candidates will work with a graduate professor on an individual basis. Candidates will study advanced research concepts, processes and approaches necessary to bring an investigation to a successful completion and subsequent publication. This course requires permission of instructor.

While you are welcome to do original research for this course, you are strongly encouraged to work with an existing course assignment, and using this course to critically analyze it and revise it for publication. The course is structured to allow you to go through this reflective process of revision in collaboration with your peers. 

Electives

As leaders deal with the issue of effecting dynamic change, they will need to consider four strategies:  1) training and support for staff; 2) realigning formal roles and relationships; 3) establishing collaborative cultures; 4) providing transition rituals. Embedded in these strategies is the understanding of levels of change cycle development; key ideas from change theory; stages of concern and the complexity of change.  Addressing these strategies is the focus of the course. 

This course will consider social structures operating within a community.  Principles and techniques of working with school personnel, organizations and members of the community will be the focus of the course with a view to promoting better public relations.

The seminars/issues in Educational Leadership will focus on a single concept in leadership which is current in the field and not addressed in depth in other Educational Leadership courses.  The topic of the seminars will be determined by the Educational Leadership Department. This course, Administering Special Education Programs, will focus on the role of the administrator in the implementation of the various legislations and policies in Ontario which impact on the provision of educational programs and services on behalf of students with special education needs. The course includes an in-depth review of the legislation and policies with respect to special education from the perspective of the administrator’s role; building positive partnerships with parents and advocates; creating and managing the school support team; and an exploration of “best practices” with respect to supporting students in their quest for educational success.