Curriculum

Master’s Degree Program (63 credit-hours)

School Psychology Planning Guide

Niagara University’s offers the master of science degree in school psychology. This program will provide candidates with an M.S. and a Certificate of Advanced Studies (CAS) in school psychology. Graduates will be eligible for provisional certification as a school psychologist by New York State and will be qualified to apply for national certification (NCSP). (Additional years of experience are required for permanent New York State certification.)

Required Courses

This course will examine the various theoretical perspectives and techniques in the field of counseling. Through application of various counseling theories to the analysis of case studies and personal growth challenges, the student will begin to develop a personal style of counseling.

Credit Hours: 3

This lab/seminar course provides students with a framework for understanding the historical development and theoretical underpinnings of intelligence assessment. To adequately prepare professionals, exposure is given to a broad range of topics such as controversies in the field of assessment, individual differences, culturally and linguistically diverse populations, measurement constructs, ethics, and the complex relationship of genetic and environmental influences on human intelligence. Through lab experience and actual case studies, students will benefit from hands-on experience with state-of-the-art assessment instrumentation.

Credit Hours: 3

This seminar course provides students with a framework for understanding the development of school psychology as a specialty within the field of psychology. The focus will be on examining the role and function of the school psychologist, legal and ethical issues in the practice of school psychology, and current and future trends in service delivery.

Credit Hours: 3

The course is designed to introduce the prospective teacher to the theories of human learning, development and motivation and the applications of these theories in the learning environment. Each of the developmental stages of early childhood, childhood, preadolescence and adolescence will be focused upon to gain awareness of human learning, maturation and motivation. Prospective teachers will be required to participate in a school-based learn and serve field placement to experience the application of theories; observe the interaction of a child/adolescent within the school, family and peer systems; and reflect upon their learning through a case-study project.

Credit Hours: 3

This course introduces prospective and practicing teachers to the characteristics of students with physical, cognitive and emotional/behavioral challenges. The parti- cipants will be introduced to legislation issues including ADA, IDEA, IEPs, transition services, inclusion, etc. Participants will explore the role of students, family and education professionals. As part of this course, participants will reflect upon 15 hours of observations and interactions with students with disabilities.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to practice the various counseling strategies and techniques learned in previous courses. Focus will be on developing the skills necessary to select the counseling intervention methods most appropriate for the specific life challenges facing the client(s).

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 651, EDU 654

This lab/seminar course provides students with a framework for understanding the complex set of challenges in assessing the strengths and needs of children and adolescents who have or are at risk for disabilities. Exposure is given to a broad range of assessment instrumentation and topics. Through lab experiences and actual case studies, students will benefit from hands-on experience with state-of-the-art assessment instrumentation and innovative approaches in assessing skills and abilities of children and adolescents.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 800

This lab/seminar course is designed to give students the opportunity to practice the various counseling strategies and techniques learned in previous courses and to refine the skills and knowledge base specific to counseling with child and adolescent populations. The focus will be on learning the research and developing the skills necessary to select the counseling intervention methods most appropriate for the specific life challenges facing school-age children.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 654

This course is designed to help practicing teachers develop greater effectiveness in teaching reading diagnostically in K-12 classrooms, especially in individualized or small group settings. Teacher participants will examine a variety of factors that influence literacy acquisition, discuss and identify various reading problems, learn to conduct a diagnostic assessment of a student’s reading performance, analyze the assessment, and plan for appropriate reading instruction.

Credit Hours: 3

This course examines the various counseling theories applicable to group counseling. Through an experimental mode of learning, the student will develop beginning skills for facilitating groups and in planning intervention strategies.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 651, EDU 654, EDU 658, EDU 617

This lab/seminar course provides candidates with a framework for understanding the complex set of challenges in working with infants, toddlers and preschoolers who have or are at risk for disabilities. To adequately prepare professionals entering the field of early intervention services, exposure is given to a broad range of topics such as normative and exceptional child development, the history of and new theoretical orientations in psycho- educational assessment, legislative and program- matic issues related to early intervention, and an overview of the multiple settings in which very young children interactively develop. Through lab experience and actual case studies, candidates will benefit from hands-on experience with state- of-the-art assessment instrumentation and innovative approaches in assessing skills and abilities of young children.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 800, EDU 802

These courses are designed to provide candidates with an introduction to school psychology practice in preparation for the subsequent counseling internships (EDU 807 and EDU 808). Candidates will be placed in a school setting for a minimum total of 400 clock hours, of which at least 150 hours are to be direct service experience. Candidates will have at least one hour equivalent weekly individual supervision as well as biweekly seminars/ group supervision.

Credit Hours: 5   /   Prerequisites: EDU 800, EDU 801, EDU 802, EDU 803, EDU 804

As an introduction to the issues which arise in counseling multicultural and diverse populations, this course will focus upon understanding the differences and similarities in values, goals and challenges of individuals from diverse and behaviors toward others from different backgrounds will be emphasized.

Credit Hours: 3

This course examines the theories of development from psychology, biology, sociology and cultural anthropology. Emphasis is placed on understanding how normal and abnormal behavior develops. Through learning about the developmental milestones and crises in the human experience, the counselor will develop skills to plan effective intervention strategies.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is an overview of the field of pharmacology. Physiological effects, psycho- logical effects, withdrawal characteristics, drug interactions and treatment applications are the focus of the course.

Credit Hours: 3

This course provides students with comprehensive instruction in contemporary, best-practice approaches in instructional consultation and the development of individual, group, and systems-level intervention programs within and exclusive of a Response to Intervention framework. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of collaborative problem solving and data-based decision making in the conceptualization, implementation, and evaluation of student intervention across academic and behavioral domains.

Credit Hours: 3

Students will develop advanced skills in diagnosis through integrating material for the intake, initial interview, social histories, and psychiatric/psychological reports. In addition, they will develop the crucial skills in client care/management including creating and implementing appropriate treatment programs, writing reports, keeping records and consulting with all professionals in the total managed care system.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 655, EDU 657

Students will be placed in school/therapeutic settings consistent with their personal goals for growth in the field of school psychology. Each internship experience will be uniquely designed to met the needs of each individual student. Basic commonalities across internships include a total of 1200 clock hours on site for the two-semester internship, 450 hours of which must be hours of direct service with students and their families. A minimum of two hours per week of on-site, individual supervision and biweekly seminars/group supervision of three hours in length will be provided throughout the internships.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 805, EDU 806

Students will be placed in school/therapeutic settings consistent with their personal goals for growth in the field of school psychology. Each internship experience will be uniquely designed to met the needs of each individual student. Basic commonalities across internships include a total of 1200 clock hours on site for the two-semester internship, 450 hours of which must be hours of direct service with students and their families. A minimum of two hours per week of on-site, individual supervision and biweekly seminars/group supervision of three hours in length will be provided throughout the internships.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 805, EDU 806

These courses are designed to provide candidates with an introduction to school psychology practice in preparation for the subsequent counseling internships (EDU 807 and EDU 808). Candidates will be placed in a school setting for a minimum total of 400 clock hours, of which at least 150 hours are to be direct service experience. Candidates will have at least one hour equivalent weekly individual supervision as well as biweekly seminars/ group supervision.

Credit Hours: 5   /   Prerequisites: EDU 800, EDU 801, EDU 802, EDU 803, EDU 804

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the principles of research in education. Students will become effective consumers of educational research by analyzing the literature in a particular area of study and synthesizing the results into material that can be applied to diverse educational settings. Students will also develop practical research skills that they might use to assist them in their own professional development. Preservice teachers and practitioners enrolled in this course will complete a field-based research project pertaining to their area of study.

Credit Hours: 3

Notes

  • Practicum clock hours must total 400 by the end of two semesters.
  • Internship clock hours must total 1,200 by the end of two semesters.
  • Successful completion of a comprehensive examination, as described in course requirements for EDU 806, is required prior to enrollment in internship.
  • Successful completion of a comprehensive portfolio, as described in course requirements for EDU 808, is required in order to attain degree.
  • All individuals, including Niagara University students, applying to school psychology must take the GRE.